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E. Coli Outbreak Spurs I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter Recall

Wednesday - Mar 15, 2017

SPRINGFIELD - The I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter Company, headquartered in Illinois, is voluntarily recalling its SoyNut Butter products after 12 cases of E. coli O157 in five states were preliminarily linked to the products. There are no cases reported in Illinois. Product testing is currently underway. SoyNut Butter is a nut-free substitute for peanut butter.

"Some infections of E. coli are mild, but others can be severe or even life-threatening, especially for young children," said Illinois Department of Public Health Director Nirav D. Shah, M.D., J.D. "If you have recently purchased soy nut butter, please check the label for the brand and throw it out if it is part of this recall."

IDPH recommends consumers do not eat any variety or size of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter or granola coated with SoyNut Butter produced by SoyNut Butter Company. Child care centers, schools, and other institutions should not serve I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter or granola coated with SoyNut Butter. Multiple varieties and sizes of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter and granola coated with SoyNut Butter are sold nationwide in stores, online, and to institutions.

Symptoms vary but often include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. People typically develop symptoms in 3-4 days after ingesting the affected product, but it could be as short as one day or as long as 10. Most people get better within 5-7 days. Contact your healthcare provider if you have diarrhea that lasts for more than three days, or is accompanied by high fever, blood in the stool, or so much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down and you pass very little urine. People who have E. coli O157-like symptoms should see a health care provide and not take antibiotics or antidiarrheal medications as they could increase the risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

You can become infected with E. coli O157 by eating contaminated food or drinks, or through contact with feces of an infected person.
To avoid E.coli:

Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water after using the bathroom.
Cook meats thoroughly and use a thermometer to indicate "doneness."
Prevent cross contamination in food preparation areas by thoroughly washing hands, counters, cutting boards, and utensils after they touch raw meat.